How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside – This article was co-authored by Colleen Demling-Riley, CPDT-KA, CBCC-KA, CDBC. Colleen Demling-Riley (CPDT-KA, CBCC-KA, CDBC) is a canine behavior consultant and the founder of Pawtopia Dog Training. With more than 20 years of experience, she specializes in creating and customizing dog management programs for dog owners. She is a Certified Pet Dog Trainer-Knowledge Assessed, Certified Behavior Consultant Canine-Knowledge Assessed, Certified Dog Behavior Consultant, and American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizen Evaluator. Colleen is a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals and has been a featured expert in national media including the New York Times, Woman’s Day, Reader’s Digest, Cosmopolitan and Yahoo.com.

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How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

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How To Potty Train Your Dog In Monsoon

If you live in an apartment, you may want to start house training your dog with puppy pads. This way, your dog can learn to relieve himself in a designated place in your house. But you may also find it helpful to try outdoor training for him. This will give you the flexibility to have your dog pee inside when you’re not at home, and go outside when you’re home.

This article was co-authored by Colleen Demling-Riley, CPDT-KA, CBCC-KA, CDBC. Colleen Demling-Riley (CPDT-KA, CBCC-KA, CDBC) is a canine behavior consultant and the founder of Pawtopia Dog Training. With more than 20 years of experience, she specializes in creating and customizing dog management programs for dog owners. She is a Certified Pet Dog Trainer-Knowledge Assessed, Certified Behavior Consultant Canine-Knowledge Assessed, Certified Dog Behavior Consultant, and American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizen Evaluator. Colleen is a member of the International Association of Canine Professionals and has been a featured expert in national media including the New York Times, Woman’s Day, Reader’s Digest, Cosmopolitan and Yahoo.com. This article was viewed 425, 575 times.

To use puppy pads and outdoor potty training together, start by establishing a regular toilet schedule. When it’s time for your dog to go to the bathroom, bring him over to the puppy pad and say “go potty” so he associates that place with toileting. When your dog starts using the puppy block consistently, start moving the block a little closer to the door each day, eventually moving the block outside. Once your dog gets the hang of using the block outside, you can stop setting up the pads. To learn how to praise your dog for going to the bathroom in the right place, keep reading! House training (or potty training) may be one of the most important things you do with your new puppy. Everyone – whether two- or four-legged – is happier when the puppy knows the rules of the road about where and when to go potty.

When working on potty training a puppy, keep in mind that it is natural for a puppy to see the whole world as a giant potty area. The keys to teaching your puppy where to take potty breaks are regular outings, proper management, appropriate supervision and positive reinforcement. (Punishment has no place in potty training!) It’s a process that takes both time and patience, but you and your puppy can master this important task.

How Often Does My Older Dog Need To Pee?

So how long does it take to potty train a puppy? That largely depends on how consistent you are and how long your puppy can hold it. (Small breed puppies typically have a harder time keeping it than large breed puppies, for example.) Below are steps for how to toilet train a puppy in seven days. You may find that it takes a little longer with your own puppy, and that’s okay!

Potty training a puppy is all about setting you and your puppy up for success. Proper management and supervision are critical to successful house training. Until your puppy is fully house trained, make sure your puppy is always managed or supervised.

Tethering to an object ensures the puppy cannot go beyond a certain boundary. The Frisco Tie Out Cable is useful for this purpose – just make sure to position it so the puppy can only access a puppy-proof area while tethered.

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

Tethering to a person makes it easier for the person to monitor the puppy’s behavior. You can use a tough mutt hands-free bungee cord to tie the puppy to you comfortably.

Help! My Dog Won’t Pee Outside! What Do I Do?

To help prevent pee on the floor, confine the puppy to an area with potty pads. The potty pads are especially important if the puppy will have to wait a long time between potty breaks.

Use a gate, such as the Carlson Pet Products Extra Wide Walk-Thru Gate or a Midwest Style Pet Gate, to block off a small room such as the kitchen or bathroom. (Part is easier to clean in case of accidents.)

You can also set up a free-standing confinement area with an ex-pen such as the Frisco Dog Exercise Pen.

If you are going to crate train your puppy, make sure the puppy is comfortable in the crate. It should be just big enough for your puppy to turn around and lie down, but not much bigger. This way, the puppy can stretch a little, but they can not potty in the corner and then snooze comfortably in another corner.

Dog Pee Post

Crates such as the Frisco Fold & Carry Double Door Dog Crate or the Frisco Indoor & Outdoor Soft Dog Crate work for short periods of confinement and to prevent accidents overnight. If your puppy keeps scaling barriers, another option is to tether the puppy to an object in a puppy-proof area, using the 10-foot Frisco Tie Out cable.

Pottying that happens outside is an opportunity for positive reinforcement for going in the right place, and the more often you reinforce appropriate pottying, the faster your puppy will be house trained. It is still important to keep an eye on the puppy, so you know if the puppy has potted or not.

“Supervised” means someone is actively watching the puppy – meaning, the person is not on the computer, not on the phone, not cooking dinner and not watching TV. The person supervising should be actively looking at and interacting with the puppy at all times. This gives the person much more chance to notice if the puppy seems to need to potty or is starting to squat.

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

If that sounds like a lot of work, that’s because it’s why it’s so important to set up appropriate management.

How To Train A Puppy To Pee Outside

A young puppy should never sleep for more than a couple of hours, except overnight. Your puppy may not be able to hold it very long.

Keep the waiting time to a couple of hours or less, except at night. Listen for “I need to potty” barks or whines in the middle of the night, too, so you can give your puppy an overnight potty break when necessary.

Now that you know how to handle your puppy’s tween potty breaks, here’s how to train a puppy by creating a consistent schedule that helps your puppy learn the right habits.

Take your puppy out on a leash. Leashing helps your puppy learn to potty on leash in general, which is helpful because you’ll probably want your dog to potty on walks at some point. It also keeps the puppy from running around and getting distracted by all the interesting things around them.

Why Won’t My Dog Poop Outside? Find Out Why Now!

Stand still in one place, in an area where it is good for your puppy to poop. Quietly watch the puppy.

By standing still, you keep the puppy in a small enough area that they will get bored with exploring fairly quickly and focus on potting faster.

Wait until the puppy has finished pottying. You don’t want to interrupt the puppy and have them finish the potty inside!

How To Make Your Dog Pee Outside

As soon as you are sure that the puppy is done pottying, offer praise and give them a tasty treat.

Why Does My Puppy Pee After Going Outside?

Note: If the puppy doesn’t pee or poop within five minutes, that’s fine. Take the puppy to a confinement area for 10-20 minutes. After 10 or 20 minutes, go back to step 1.

Fun time can take place outdoors if there is a safe area off leash (and if your puppy likes being outdoors), or indoors under supervision if outdoors is not an option (or if your puppy does not want to stay outdoors ).

Give your puppy off-leash fun time once the puppy pees or poops the puppy learns that pottying leads to more fun.

Most importantly, avoid the common mistake of confining the puppy right after they potty. If you bring the puppy back to their confinement area right after a successful mission, they learn that pottying ends the fun. Then they might start waiting longer and longer to potty, which is the opposite of what you want, right?

Puppy Toilet Training

Give your puppy plenty of chances to potty in an appropriate potty area. Then use positive reinforcement (treats, play, praise) to encourage your puppy to keep pottying in those areas.

The more times your puppy gets it right (and the fewer times your puppy has an accident),

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